People Insights

Inside The Interview

Kelly Daniels, a Recruitment Specialist from our Chicago office, shares some of her own interesting interview tactics after watching an episode of “The Job Interview.”

While flipping through channels, I discovered a TV show called “The Job Interview.”  This show helps companies to identify qualified candidates and showcases the interview process for various positions. I was quite impressed that CNBC aired a program so real and related to what I do as a recruiter.

“The Job Interview” offers a great way to learn how organizations interact with job seekers and examines the process a company may use.  It also illustrates which industries are hiring talent, and provides insights into pay rates offered.

Some hiring managers’ ideas were very creative.  For instance, one had each candidate walk into a room in which no chair was provided for them. The idea was to observe how candidates responded to an uncomfortable situation.  Did they find a chair for themselves?  Stand?  Circle uncomfortably?  It provided insight into candidate reactions, problem solving, and the ways individual responses may influence an ability to succeed in specific positions.

This reminded me of interesting interview tactics my colleagues and I have adopted or witnessed on-the-job:

Honesty is the best policy. To get at just how genuine and self-reflective a candidate is, a simple question can help:  “Think back to a situation that, after reflection, you realize you could have handled things better.  What was that time, and how would you change things?”  Watch to see how much the candidate struggles with the response, and is the response heart-felt?  Does it feel like a real ‘lesson-learned’ moment from which the candidate learned?  Or does that candidate give a non-response, e.g., “I went through this project and realized that my perfectionism really cost me a lot of time in my personal life, but it helped get the job done.”  If you get one of these lazy non-responses, don’t be afraid to professionally call the candidate on it:  “I can see how that would have been a challenge, but could we dig a bit deeper and talk about a time that you now feel you made a genuine mistake in a decision you made or the way you addressed a team member?”  Hopefully you get a meaningful response, and it sheds light on personal values and character.

The barrage. Posing questions  in rapid succession helps you to observe how a candidate’s mind works under pressure.  For example, “out of your previous jobs, which was your favorite?  Do you like working in teams or individually?  If you won the lottery, what would you do with the money?  If there was one thing you could change about your current job that would make you want to stay, what would it be?”  Moving quickly between questions helps to map a candidate’s comfort with change.

The secret interview. Who else interacts with a candidate during the interview process?  Perhaps the receptionist has some insight!  A receptionist’s observations of the candidate while he or she waited can be quite telling. How did the candidate treat the receptionist and those with whom they sat?  How did that behavior correlate to the experience you observed in the interview?

Discovering and finalizing the best candidate is a challenge.  A recruiter should always think outside of the box to discover new and interesting ways of discovering what each candidate brings to the table.


Want a new job? Position for success.

Alison Lewis, a Recruitment Specialist out of our Buffalo branch, shares her tips on how to position yourself for success if you are hoping to land a new job in 2018.

The third month of 2018 has begun—that makes it a great time to check your progress against your 2018 resolutions and goals! Is one of your goals landing a new position? If so, make sure that you do everything you can to cast yourself and your credentials in a positive light.

That means staying away from the following:

Rude and Negative Behavior – How you behave at social events or over the phone reflects on you. You alone control your behavior and reactions, and there is always a chance you may interact again with a specific person. How you treat a recruiter is how you will be imagined interacting with teammates. If you treat the person who has power to get you in front of an employer poorly, a recruiter will question how you would treat coworkers or a manager.

Beware of gossip.  It is negative behavior!  Good rule of thumb: someone quick to lend a listening ear is also often a running mouth.

Outdated Skills and Materials – When actively seeking a job, prepare by reading articles, practicing interview questions/answers, researching companies, attending networking events, providing correct contact information, and updating your resume. It confuses a recruiter when people submit an out-of-date resume or provide incorrect information. If you describe yourself as detail-oriented, reliable, and successful, be sure that your resume and cover letter reinforce that.

Passivity – Growth opportunities are born of hard work, productivity, results, and a positive reputation. Answering questions without specifics or descriptive examples will not help a recruiter or interviewer understand how you will perform in a position or contribute to a company.

Also, be precise and know what you want. Applying for a job is a big deal and a reflection of yourself. Do not apply to every job under the sun—that makes it difficult for a recruiter or employer to take you seriously.

Ghosting – This one should go without saying, but you’d be surprised. When a potential employer reaches out to you, respond. When you set up an interview, show up. Recruiters know other recruiters; don’t get yourself blacklisted.

Full Voicemail – It is amazing how many people who apply for positions don’t set up voicemails or have mailboxes that are always full. How will a recruiter feel comfortable believing that you are detail-oriented and organized if you cannot maintain your voicemails? Also, your voicemail greeting—just like your email address—should be simple, identifiable, and professional.

The future of your career is in your hands.  Be mindful about always representing yourself as a detail-oriented, courteous, and conscientious candidate, and you’ll be well on your way to achieving those 2018 goals.


For a Great Team, Focus on the Roots

Jason Hatch, an Account Executive from our Minneapolis office, shares his thoughts on how to lead a team to success.

Many articles explain the duties of an efficient manager, but do not shed light on what specific personality traits a true leader exhibits, and in what ways he or she goes beyond the ordinary steps.

Imagine that your employees are trees. Most sales managers focus on what that tree is producing, i.e., the fruit, representing sales/results. They focus so much on the fruit that they fail to notice the branches, trunk, or—most importantly—the roots. If you ignore the roots for too long, the tree will die and yield no more fruit.

In this analogy, the roots of the tree are the motivators for each team member. Each is unique. It is the manager/leader’s job to focus on and nurture these roots.

One method is to simply take the time to learn about the members of your team as people and discover what motivates them. If asked, most people will cite “money” as a main motivator. That may be true, but what we do with our money is the true motivator. For example, the money I earn goes towards taking care of my wife, daughter, and daughter-on-the-way. It also enables me to play golf, which is my greatest passion outside of my faith, family, and friends. Learn these details about your team members and you will better understand how to engage and motivate them.

Doling out blanket rewards is NOT a good motivator. There is nothing worse than exceeding goals and receiving an irrelevant or generic reward in return. As a manager, you may love free lunch or happy hours, but what if your team member packs a lunch and has a family to get home to after work? Personally, I’m happy to pay for my own food and, at day’s end, I want to be with my family.  But if you were to offer a half day on Friday to play golf?—I’d be all in!

Many great workers fail to realize their full potential, because their managers never invested in learning about them as people. I have been blessed with a company who exhibits a warm and invested leadership team. What can you do to create or encourage this type of team? If you are a manager, focus on the roots. It will bring not only a harmonious, professional environment, but also a tree with stronger productivity.


6 Tips for Landing a Dream Job

Scott Fiege, a recruiting manager out of our Buffalo branch office, shares his tips on how to land the dream job you are after.

You catch wind of the perfect job. Whether you are underpaid, underappreciated, would prefer a shorter drive to work, desire an elevated job title, or are soon to be relocating, this job could be a great fit for your needs.

You should know, for every position we post, we receive anywhere from 25 to 50 applications through sources like Indeed, Zip Recruiter, CareerBuilder, Monster, etc.  We identify another 50 to 75 from our pipelines, and from job boards and LinkedIn. With all sources combined, there’s over 100 people interested in one job.

Considering these numbers, the odds of being granted an interview are not high. Even if you meet the required skills/education, hard skills alone won’t secure you the position. In most searches, the manager reviews at least 10 profiles to select for interviews, with a subsequent three to five candidates scheduled for appointments. And finally, only one receives the offer.

  • What qualities set a preferred candidate apart?
  • How do you increase your chances for an interview?
  • What is the best way to secure a job offer?

My ten years spent in recruiting have taught me some tips of the trade that may help better your experience and move you toward your goals.

Be interesting!

I’ve seen a lot of resumes and cover letters, and have sat through many interviews and phone screens. If you—as the applicant—cannot gather enthusiasm for your background, neither will I or another hiring manager. Is your resume up to date? It should reflect not only your experience, but your personality.

Motivation and excitement for the job challenge will set you apart during conversations with a recruiter. Keep ego firmly in check, but do illustrate your accomplishments with a friendly smile and attitude. Keep answers to no more than a minute in length and try your best to not interrupt the interviewer. Exhibit enthusiasm and mention the ways in which you are a team player with a broad interest in helping a department.


Are you aware of the most common interview questions and techniques used by hiring managers? Have you given thought to the financial compensation you would need in order to leave your current position? Are you confident of your market value? Are you clear on the manner in which you would decline a counter offer at your current employer? Have you familiarized yourself with the company websites and/or researched the background of the hiring managers prior to the interview?

This is where an applicant exceeds his/her competition. You should know, for example, that the company name is Sealing Devices, rather than Hearing Devices. Investigate the background of the hiring managers in case there is a friendly and common connection to mention during the interview. Dress for success in your most flattering and recently dry cleaned outfit. Practice answering questions in front of a mirror and role play with a helpful friend.

Use your connections or find common ground

Companies and hiring managers feel at ease hiring someone they know or referred over to them. They hire candidates with whom they share an alma mater, sorority, volunteer/community group, or other common connections. Some call it politics. I call it “well played.” Check out LinkedIn, or touch base with your network to determine whether you already have a valuable connection at the company for which you’d like to work.

Remember, interviewers are often nervous

Their job during the interview is to be tough, yet fair. Parts of the interview may feel disappointing or nerve-racking. True story: interviewers are sometimes as anxious as you are. They may not know the best questions to ask or feel they have an adequate handle on the type of candidate a department is hoping for. Your game plan may not go as expected. Roll with the punches, remain confident, and focus on what qualities paint you the best candidate for the job.

Become the solution

The most attractive candidates bring solutions to a void a company hopes to fill. Keep this in mind during the interview. Bring polished examples of your work and share wins from the past that could add to the organization’s productivity and contribute to a positive office culture.

Keep emotions in check

Interviewing can become emotional. You’ve spent money adding to your education, and time and effort in building your network and resume. I’ve heard many stories that inspired me to write up an offer that very second. We appreciate emotion—it illustrates to the hiring managers that you’re passionate about what you do. However, stay calm and present in the moment. Keep in mind that they are investing in you, and will prefer to move forward with a candidate driven not only by passion, but also by a calm and mature rationale.

There is a lot of talent out in the world, and we hope this helps you position yourself as a top candidate for your dream job.



Candidate Experience Isn’t Just About Your Career Site

Frank Gullo, Director of Digital and Mobile Strategy for Superior Group, writes about areas to focus on for the best candidate experience.

“The last best experience that anyone has anywhere becomes the minimum expectation for the experiences they want everywhere.” You’ll often hear this at marketing and employee experience conferences, and though it’s unclear who said it first, what is certain is that experience matters, and when it comes to technology, it’s always changing.

Discussion about candidate experience often turns to a company’s career site, and rightly so, as the career site is a key destination for candidates considering employment. Are the job descriptions compelling or flat? Is the application process easy or cumbersome? Is the site mobile optimized or still using a legacy desktop design? However, while it’s important to optimize career sites for candidate experience, with today’s mobile and social web, candidate experience interactions are increasingly taking place beyond the career site.

According to a 2017 Talent Board survey of over 180,000 job seekers, candidates typically check a variety of sources when they research jobs, and 42% say that a source other than the company career site was their most valuable resource when evaluating opportunities. Below are the top six sources:

  1. Company career site, 58.07%
  2. Employee, candidate or customer referral, 35.71%
  3. LinkedIn career page(s), 33.69%
  4. Job boards, 30.64%
  5. Employer review sites, 29.18%
  6. Job notification/agents, 28.11%

With so much of the candidate experience taking place beyond the career site, it’s important to ensure those experiences are on brand, seamless, technically smooth, and positive for the candidate. Here are five key candidate experience areas to focus on other than your career site.

  1. Job boards – Millions of candidates use job boards and aggregators to locate job opportunities every day. In some cases, candidates find and apply to jobs on those sites without ever visiting a company’s career site. Today’s job boards range from standard job boards like Monster and CareerBuilder, to aggregators like Indeed, to online classifieds, like Craigslist. Whatever the platform, it’s important to understand the candidate experience on those job boards and do all you can to ensure it’s positive and integrated with your talent acquisition goals.
  2. Search – Online search comes in many flavors that impact the candidate job search experience, and there are corresponding search tactics available to improve it. Career site content and organic SEO helps influence search engine result rankings for key terms, pay-per-click (PPC) advertising can drive traffic and experience, and alert tools, like Google Alerts, assist in monitoring what’s showing up in search. In addition, the new Google for Jobs indexes and displays current and relevant job posts right in search engine results.
  1. Review sites – Based on research, negative reviews impact reputation and customer/candidate acquisition. In addition, companies typically only hear from a small percentage of detractors. Fortunately, review sites like GlassDoor and Vault provide organizations with opportunities to respond to reviews, locate patterns, turn negative experiences into positive ones, and let candidates know that their experience and voice matters.
  1. Maps and locations – Mobile is critical today, and more and more candidate experiences take place on mobile devices. This is especially true if your company has physical locations. In these cases, part of the candidate experience involves looking up your address in map applications, which increasingly are tied to business pages, like Google My Business and Bing Places for Business. A simple address lookup will show not only the physical location, but also contact and overview information, photos, and reviews. It’s important to know the experience these location-based applications surface and use the management tools available to ensure all the information is accurate and helpful.
  1. Social media – The use of social media to find jobs continues to grow. According to recent Pew research, of the nearly two-thirds of Americans who use social media, 35% of social media users have used social media to look for or research jobs, and 21% have applied for a job they first found out about through social media. With so much job-related activity occurring now on social, seamless social candidate experience aligns best with a strong, consistent employer brand and useful social jobs content appropriate per network and demographic.

Candidate experience is more important than ever. With low unemployment, a skills gap, and fierce competition for talent, having a great candidate experience is critical. The above are just a few of the key areas to focus. What are yours?



4 Keys to Building an Employer Brand

In today’s competitive talent landscape, companies of all shapes and sizes are trying to develop new strategies to recruit and retain top talent. Even companies with dedicated recruitment teams know that getting the best talent in the door is a difficult task, which makes it imperative that companies use the best strategies to differentiate their brand. One of the best ways to do that? A strong employer brand.

To put it simply, the best way to recruit, is to not have to. According to new LinkedIn research, 83% of talent leaders believe that employer brands are crucial to hiring top talent. When employer brands are strong, and potential employees are seeking you out rather than vice versa, your company’s talent pipeline will be flush with fantastic résumés and candidates. But, with so many different brands out there competing for attention, it can be difficult to break through the noise.

To get you started, below are some very simple, and low-cost strategies that companies like Zappos, Netflix, Google, and Virgin America use to help create and drive their employer brand.

Harness What Makes Your Company Unique

Brands are a lot more than a logo and a great website. What a brand really is, is what people feel and think when they see that logo, website, or social media pages. What can a candidate really sense when they see your page? Is the company centered around work-life balance? The culture? The physical office space? The benefits? This employee value proposition is what potential employees are looking for. Remember, job candidates are looking for the best fit for them, and their number one question is: “What can I expect to receive while working here?”

Your company isn’t the same as every other company out there. Tout your unique qualities—it’s what differentiates you from the pack. The best way to do so is your brand.

Your Employees are a Referral Machine

One of the best ways to create a positive brand is empowering your current employees. Employees can be the biggest boosters to your business, as they share their experiences with friends and family who also repeat those stories to others.

By building and promoting a winning workplace culture, and marketing that culture to your employees, they will provide companies with a compounding PR investment. Oftentimes your employees will become your best recruiters or sales people by simply enjoying what they do, and telling people about it. One great social media post by a happy employee can be spread to thousands of people in just a few clicks.

Use Social Media

This has been touched on already, but the power of social media is something that organizations of all shapes and sizes need to tap into. Take Southwest Airlines for example, they launched their blog Nuts About Southwest in 2006 to show candidates what life was like in the day-to-day operations of the company. To date, they are one of the most active brands on Facebook, and their employees regularly share posts and real-life scenarios of how the company is run. It not only engages current employees, but gives prospects a unique view into the life of what it is like to be a Southwest employee.

Use Marketing

Use your company’s marketing and design teams to proactively reach wider audiences on digital media. Through a myriad of marketing tools, organizations of all sizes can target their audience by geography and interests. Not only can they help with paid media, but marketing can also write and craft free content for audiences to consume while they are on their employment search.

In today’s candidate-driven market, attracting top talent can be a challenge, but you can get ahead of the curve by getting proactive with your company’s brand.




3 Proven Strategies to Recruit Top Talent

3 Proven Strategies Top Companies Use to Recruit Top Talent

Recruiting talent is a priority for any organization in a tight labor market. From manufacturing to information technology, the demand for skilled employees is at an all-time high, and companies need intelligent strategies to attract value-add candidates.

On average, companies lose $14,000 for every job that remains open for three months and they face compounding losses with every open position, as numerous resources become dedicated to picking up the slack, or working fill the position.

However, not all companies can dedicate a team to recruitment, and candidates in demand often field multiple offers. This is especially true as the labor market has become more competitive in the economic recovery. Since this upturn has made competing for talent more difficult, best-in-class companies have elected to use both new and tested strategies to find, attract, and onboard the talent they need to fill gaps in their workforce.

If you’d like to attract talent to your organization, it’s critical to understand strategies that can help bolster your company’s recruiting and improve your goals.

Build Your Employer Brand
In today’s age, “social media” is just another term for the current state of the internet. As people of all ages consume the majority of their content from their social media pages and feeds, employers have an unprecedented opportunity to build a candidate experience for their brands by establishing a relevant social presence—that mixes a healthy dose of useful content with personality.

Knowing that candidates use social media to understand and assess organizational cultures, 40% of best-in-class companies have turned to social tools to strengthen their digital brands. It’s free PR, and an easy way to reach a diverse talent pool without investing major dollars.

Develop Your Employee Networks

In today’s world, there are few degrees of separation between resources. Often, your current employees can be your best tool for finding that next great hire, and a strong employer brand will help facilitate that hire. That’s why 37% of best-in-class companies are engaging their employees in employee referral programs to funnel qualified candidates to their recruitment teams. By mobilizing your own employee network, many qualified candidates are much closer than most companies would believe.

Engage a Strategic Partner

Ultimately, many companies have specialized needs, and it takes the already overburdened HR departments too long to source candidates who are in high demand and have more competitive offers from other suitors.

By engaging a staffing partner that specializes in recruiting highly-skilled and scarce labor, and one that has access to deep talent pools, organizations can reduce their staffing costs by reining in productivity losses. Staffing partners have already done the legwork of developing their pipelines of candidates and they are able to supply highly-specialized workers quickly.

According to an Aberdeen Group research report, 49% of best-in-class companies engage a strategic staffing partner to help find their needed talent. Not only will a staffing firm provide talent to businesses, but they will also apply trend analysis to forecast future business requirements and talent needs. This approach is extremely helpful when a large percentage of an organization’s workforce is composed of temporary and contingent workers.

Whether you’re a multi-national firm with a total talent management strategy in place, or a small to mid-sized company, everyone needs to bring in quality hires to help build their business. Applying a strategic mix of expert partnerships, employee referrals, and strong employment branding, companies can expect to find the next-level employees they need.








6 Easy Ways to Leverage Social Media to Build a Talent Network

Whether you are a recruiter, a human resources leader, or a hiring manager building a talent network, using social media platforms is vitally important. While originally, social media was exactly that—for social purposes—a majority of people are now using social media to access news, information and for professional reasons. Each month, 106 million people visit LinkedIn, and each day, 40% of those people check their newsfeed. If you are a leader in your company, make it a priority to look at these sites as tools and take steps to build your network to include friends, family, coworkers, industry leaders and competitors (yes!). You will soon find that what you have is a Talent Network that when called on, will produce leads, referrals and some of the best hires.

There are many social media sites, but the most obvious for business use is LinkedIn. Many of the same tactics and philosophy also apply to other social media sites as well.

Having a presence (an account) is the obvious first step.  But it takes more than just an account…you have to use it with a purpose! Here are some important things to ensure you make the most of your social media presence:

Make sure your profile is updated and professional
It seems obvious, but many people struggle to have relevant content on their own profiles. Have an updated profile including an updated picture. The selfie in your car five years ago isn’t going to cut it! A suit is not required…but take a pic that is reflective of you and the industry in which you work. Having a professional LinkedIn photo makes your profile 14 times more likely to be viewed.

Make your page about the candidate
As a recruiter, don’t waste your time taking the, “me, me, me,” approach to building your profile. Focus the language on your profile to illustrate your ability to help others find their next career. They are looking at your profile to see how you will help them, not the other way around.

Curate and share engaging content
Join groups related to your interests and the industry in which you work. By doing this, you can stay engaged with trending and current topics within your industry. This also gives you the perfect place to curate relevant and engaging content to share with your peers. According to LinkedIn’s social recruiting guide, successful recruiters shared 2.5x more job posts through LinkedIn vs. unsuccessful recruiters. If you’re looking for a great tool to find content in your industry, try Buzzsumo.

Build on what you have
Sometimes there are very few degrees of separation between you and that next hire. By connecting with friends, coworkers, industry leaders, AND competitors, you will have a wide audience to share content, jobs, and news. While you may not want to share things with your competitors, your next best employee could be from their company!

These platforms also give you the opportunity to continue contact with other applicants you have placed in the past. Keep in touch with talented people; it’s likely they—or someone they know—will be looking in the future.

Have a Schedule
By creating a social media calendar or weekly plan, it becomes a lot easier to distribute original content across your networks. Sometimes it can be difficult to manage multiple social platforms without a schedule or tool. By using tools like Buffer or Hootsuite, users can post to all their networks on a set schedule that helps cadence your content to your audience.

Build Your Employer Brand
36% of successful recruiters and talent executives have strongly communicated their company brand through social media—it’s a great place to give your company culture a place in your strategy. Align your strategies with your marketing team to help push out engaging content across your platforms and build upon the key messaging that goes to your audience. Putting in 1-2 hours per week building branded content can do wonders for your company persona. By doing so, you designate yourself—and your company—as subject-matter experts and trusted sources of information. All of this helps to build authentic engagement that builds relationships.

At the end of the day, social recruitment and talent pipelining is about engagement, and the only way to achieve it is through quality content and authentic social interaction that builds relationships and communities of people. By following the ideas above, you can begin to build the bases of your talent network and leverage social media to attract and retain talent.

If you are not already, I invite you to please connect with me:








How to Go Beyond Salary and Attract Talent for the Future

Recently, one of our recruiters was on the phone with a seasoned candidate, discussing a lucrative high paying opportunity in Southern California.  The conversation was going great—until the discussion came around to the name of the client.  Once he found out the name of the company, the candidate said, “Oh!  It’s with XYZ company!  I wouldn’t work there if you paid me $400/hr!  I have heard nothing but terrible things about that place!”

We could have paid the candidate more than what he is making currently, offered him better benefits, etc., but he wouldn’t hear it.  The company’s reputation in the talent community ended the conversation before the recruiting could ever really start.

Word travels fast today with social media and online review sites at the forefront. Sites such as Glassdoor readily list thoughts, gripes and comments from employees for anyone to see.  In 2016, a company is more challenged than ever to create an internal and external image that will attract and not repel talent.

There is hope!  While maintaining your company’s image on social media and the internet can be a challenge, it also opens an opportunity for a company to create and foster a brand that attracts talent.  Here are some best practices and ideas to create an environment where you can not only compete for top talent—top talent will be competing to come work for you!

  • Create a company mission that people can align with and get behind, and work on an online brand and social media presence that candidates can find and align with. Employees like to be a part of something great. Create a brand out of that mission and watch the talent come to you.
  • Align your recruitment process with the company’s mission and drive candidate engagement. With so much competition in the job market, companies need to drive candidate engagement and keep them “hooked” early on in the process; otherwise, you will lose their attention to another opportunity.
  • Create a culture that promotes creativity, inclusion and balance. Micromanagement and forcing people to work 60 hours a week is not what employees today are going to align with—and they’ll note that when speaking with others outside of the company.  They are looking for flexibility.   Give them flexibility and balance and you may find that they work 60 hours a week without you even asking!
  • Today’s workforce wants challenge and knowing that once they achieve the current hurdle, the next challenge will be waiting. Furthermore, they want to know there will be opportunity to advance within the company in a short amount of time.   And remember, advancement doesn’t need to be a promotion; often, candidates are looking for lateral moves that will broaden their experience and exposure within the company.
  • And finally, turn your employees into your brand ambassadors and they will help drive the talent community to you through their own personal and social networks. In today’s labor market, a company must use every resource at its disposal to attract talent and no one is more convincing at telling “why come work at XYZ company” than the happy talented people you already have working for you!

Winning Recipe for Job Descriptions

Here’s the situation: your job description is long and boring. The good thing is that the majority of your competitors’ job descriptions are also boring, chocked full of buzzwords and language that make the average hiring manager seem intimidating.

Unfortunately, job seekers want to feel comfortable when applying for a job versus intimidated.

In terms of a marketing tool for your business, a job description is often the first impression that a potential candidate is going to see, and it could set your company apart from your competitors and make or break your chances of hiring some potentially amazing people.

While not everyone is a wordsmith, everyone has access to Google, and that is where we set our sights when looking for job descriptions that we thought were worthy of making our list of three best.


It’s no surprise that a site that helps promising ideas take root has fun and welcoming job descriptions. Kickstarter does a great job of eliminating the buzzwords and displaying a warm and employee-friendly workplace.




Bonobos takes every advantage to brand itself on its careers pages. They’re a little out there, and it’s a good thing if you are too.




Google knows itself, and they want people to be happy working there—and their careers page and job descriptions speak to their high hopes for your future.



Each of these companies keep it simple, fun, and carefree. In these examples, each company has replaced stodgy buzzwords, and long-winded descriptions for much more conversational and personal job postings that describe everyday life at their company.

Not only is this strategy much more inviting—it’s more successful.